What foods trigger the stress response? Why?


 And Vice Versa!

 

There are a number of foods that trigger the stress response. These foods are said to work on the sympathetic nervous system (which is a big part of the stress response) (Zucker, 2000). These pseudostressors are as follows:

a.  Caffiene containing products – these products increase metabolism and alertness, which, in turn, causes a release of hormones such as adrenaline (Zucker, 2000). It can also increase blood pressure and heart rate. Another issue with these foods is that they can cause havoc to happen on the nervous and digestive systems. Like in a stressful situation, the body begins to use that fight or flight response. It might increase its rate of fluid elimination as well (Zucker, 2000).

b.  Carbohydrates – The body has an extremely hard time digesting these types of foods (which includes rice, flour, and that horrid and evil high-fructose corn syrup). These foods can also cause malfunctions in the body. The reaction of the pancreas and insulin production can be devastating on the system when lots of carbs are consumed (or a small amount in T2DM or prediabetics). I don’t want to preach or drag on about this, but it is important to understand that these foods can cause the body to become very stressed and can lead to hypoglycemia, diabetes, and more.

c.  Processed foods – Yes, in today’s world a lot of people live on them. I have recently gone to a way of life in which I am cutting out most (if not all) of the processed foods I eat. This is because these foods are like a poison to the body. It is possible that these types of foods could be behind the excitement of the central nervous system in children with ADHD or other hyperactivity disorders (Zucker, 2000). I highly recommend people stay away from these. Even hydrogenated vegetable oils are reportedly not healthy. One might even call them poison.

d.  Alcohol – It is a depressant, but just as in the carb and sugar situations, alcohol can lend itself to that insulin reaction in the body, putting it under a great deal of stress (Zucker, 2000).

There is so much to talk about on this topic! The literature is out there to help explain this. You can check out the Undergroundwellness.com website I list in the references to find out more!

Also, like I said earlier, cortisol plays a major role in the process of stress response…and some foods (like diets high in carbs or too low in carbs) have a major affect on this. When the cortisol acts, the body reacts.

Have a healthy day!

Rachel

References

Croxton, S. (2010, Dec. 15). Ponder this: Grains, robots, and zombies. Retrieved from http://undergroundwellness.com/grains-robots-and-zombies/

Zucker, M. (2000, May). Food and stress – Eating as a reaction to stress. Retrieved from http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0FKA/is_5_62/ai_62702342/

About these ads

About alternefit

Rachel Flowers is an advocate for healthy living through education and lifestyle changes. She has a BA in psychology, an MA in teaching and education, an AAS in graphic design, and is pursuing her BS in health and wellness. Rachel is also working toward her FDN certification, a C.H.E.K. certification, and a CFN certification. In her quest to get herself and others around her healthy, Rachel has found that she can use her writing and technical abilities to spread the word regarding whole health and wellness, truths versus fallacies in health, paradigms that should be changed, and history and biochemistry that might help many others become healthier. Those around Rachel have encouraged her to pursue her passions in health and wellness. Throughout the process of creating her own health information and assistance business and blog, Rachel has also been encouraged by the community members. Check her out at her website! http://alternefit.com
This entry was posted in ADHD, Childhood Disorders, Chronic Illness, Diabetes, Health and Wellness, Hyperglycemia, Hypoglycemia, Nutrition, stress reduction and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to What foods trigger the stress response? Why?

  1. scrapscot says:

    What a great blog! Rachel is a wealth of knowledge!!

  2. alternefit says:

    I wanted to clarify something about this post:

    I did say stress could make you lose weight…but I didn’t qualify that. It is not a healthy weight loss! It is dangerous. Essentially, it can supress your appetite and do major damage to many parts of your body.

    Thanks and have a healthy day!

    Rachel

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s